Political Correctness

The term “political correctness” has become code for so many things lately; from conversations about women and racial and ethnic minorities. It has become a license for some people to say anything they want, about any individual or social group without having to suffer the consequences or even think about the psychological or physical hardships inflected.

Cynthia Reyes

There is such power in a single act of kindness.

And so much potential when we try to understand.

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Why do we use the term ‘political correctness’?

First used in Soviet Russia in the early 20th century – to describe behaviours that toed the Communist party line — it’s morphed into a Western insult.

blog-photo-christmas-2012From reading comments made online and in print articles, and talking to a few friends, I gather it’s a term used by members of any powerful/majority group (e.g. Whites, Christians, Able-bodied, Male, Non-Immigrant, etc.). But it goes beyond those groups.

I also gather that the term gets used when we are about to say something unkind, or pass on a negative generalization about a member or members of a group.

And it’s also used to decry behaviours that we consider too polite, too considerate of others.

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Can there be such a thing as being…

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“Whitening” the Resume

Resume-Format

In the late nineties, I was a journalist with CBC TV in Toronto, doing a documentary series on new immigrants to Canada.

The TV cameras followed one man and his wife on their journey from Shanghai to Canada, and in his early weeks of settlement in Toronto. They had worked as electrical engineers in power plants in China. Now, like most new immigrants, they were starting over.

We were there when they moved into their one-bedroom apartment above a convenience store. We were there when they went to the local job placement office to search for openings and to update and print off their resumes. And we there when they bumped up against the stark reality of discrimination.

I knew him by his real name, which was, of course, Chinese. His accented English was quite good because he studied English in China. We talked frequently during those weeks, exchanging phone calls to catch up on his efforts to find a job.

Then one day I got a message written on a sheet of paper that “Andrew” had called. I didn’t recognize the name. Once I called back, I recognized his voice right away. He was the same person I’d been talking to all those weeks, except his new name was Andrew.  I asked him why he had changed his name. He said that acquaintances in Toronto’s Chinese community had advised him to change his Chinese name to a “Canadian name” if he wanted to get a job. That’s what Chinese immigrants have to do, he was told. Once he change his name, his phone began to ring.

I recalled that story today as I read a Toronto Star story about a new study by University of Toronto researchers. According to the study, 40% of non-white job seekers are “whitening” their resumes in order to get called for job interviews. Names such as the Chinese “Lei” become “Luke”.

That’s not the only change applicants are making to their resumes in their effort to ‘whiten’ their profiles.

multicultural workforce

Only 10% of African-Canadians who included experience with African-Canadian organizations were invited to interviews, but that rate jumped to 25.5% when they deleted that experience from their resumes.

I can relate to this. When I was recruited by the CBC in the late 80’s, a manager on the hiring panel asked me if I could be “objective” covering the black community in Ottawa because he noticed I had indicated on my resume that I had volunteered with a few black community organizations. I told him I could be objective and that because of my involvement in the community I had unique access  to the black community other reporters did not have. I also pointed out that my resume also included my volunteer work with the YMCA and that I am certain I would be able to objectively cover stories about the Y. I got the job.

Sonia Kang, the lead author of “Whitened Resumes, Race and Self-Representation in the Labour Market” says the findings show that job applicants from racial minority groups are fighting back against discrimination.

In our practice here at DiversiPro, we have heard these stories over and over.  They are not new. We have been told of immigrants changing their names, their accents and their experience to be more acceptable to other Canadians.

We’ve also heard from immigrants from former British or French colonies in the Caribbean and elsewhere whose European names have disguised their race or ethnicities until they turn up for a job interview – only to find the welcome mat withdrawn.

It’s discouraging to hear the results of the research. But the encouraging news is that new immigrants and people from racial minority backgrounds are finding ways to adapt and work around a system that is not often based on merit but how well a hiring manager believes a job candidate will “fit” into the organization.

I have no doubt that such short-sightedness has deprived companies of competent, hardworking individuals who could have contributed to the bottom line.